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Essential Oils:   A-C    D-L    M-P    Q-Z

A-C
Angelica root
Aromatic Ravensara
Basil
Bergamot
Blackcurrent bud absolute
Black Spruce
Cardamom
Carrot seed
Catnip
Cedarwood Atlas
Cedarwood Virginiana
Cinnamon leaf
Citronella
Clary Sage
Clove bud
Chamomile German
Chamomile Roman
Cognac green
Cognac white
Coffee oil-roasted
Cornmint
Cypress
  • Welcome to Essential oils from A-C.

  • Angelica Root

    Botanical binomial: Angelica archangelica

    Family: Apiaceae (Umbelliferae)

    Other names: N/A

    Country of Origin: Eastern Europe

    Part of plant used in production: Roots

    Methods of production: Steam distillation

    Description: Fern-like leaves of up to 2 meters high and umbels of flowers. The root is large and aromatic.
    Characteristics: A strong, earthy, peppery fragrance
    Properties: Antispasmodic, carminative, diaphoretic, digestive, diuretic, nervine, stimulant, tonic, stomachic, expectorant
    Constituents: Alpha-pinene, camphene, sabinene, d-3-carene, alpha-phellanderene
    Uses: A spiritual and nervine oil, angleica helps people re-balance their nervous systems and rediscover their inner stamina. It is also a fertilizer and can help regenerate sickly plants. Inhale in vapour or use topically.
    Blends well with: Bergamot, clary sage, lavender, sandalwood, vetivier, pine, rosemary, juniper, cardamom, lemongrass, lemon, eucalyptus
    Interesting Facts: : Used in purification rituals since the Middle Ages, this angel oil restores vitality and is particularly useful in the winter months. Traditional Chinese medicine uses Angelica root to scatter wind cold.
    Safety: Not recommended for use during pregnancy. Non-toxic and non-irritant but is phototoxic so only apply at night or skin not exposed to the sun.
  • Aromatic Ravensara

    Botanical binomial: Ravensara aromatica

    Family: Lauraceae

    Other names:

    Country of Origin: Madagascar

    Part of plant used in production: Leaves

    Methods of production: Steam distillation

    Description: A large rainforest tree native to Madagascar.
    Characteristics: Aromatic ravensara is a clear with a tinge of yellow oil that has a slightly medicinal, eucalyptus-like aroma with a slight sweetness and fruity hint.
    Properties: Analgesic, anti-allergenic, anti-bacterial, anti-microbial, anti-depressant, anti-fungal, anti-septic, anti-spasmodic, anti-viral, aphrodisiac, disinfectant, diuretic, expectorant, relaxant, and tonic substance.
    Constituents: Limonene, Sabinene, Isoledene, Estragole, beta-Caryophyllene, beta-Myrcene, alpha-Terpinene, alpha-Pinene, Linalool.
    Uses: The uplifting effects of aromatic ravensara is an excellent treatment for depression, preventing negative thoughts. It is also an excellent treatment for the loosen of phlegm, which is beneficial for colds, flu, pneumonia, bronchitis, other respiratory tract infections. Used to treat cold sores, herpes, shingles, joint and muscular pain, and chronic fatigue syndrome.
    Blends well with: Bay, bergamot, black pepper, cardamom, clary sage, cedarwood, cypress, eucalyptus, frankincense, geranium, ginger, grapefruit, lavender, lemon, marjoram, pine, rosemary, sandalwood, tea tree and thyme.
    Interesting Facts: The essential oil of Ravensara Aromatica is praised in Madagascar as a cure all oil similar to that of tea tree in Australia.
    Safety: Due to its aphrodisiac nature it is not recommended for pregnant women.
  • Basil

    Botanical binomial: Ocimum basilicum

    Family: Lamiaceae (Labiatae)

    Other names: Sweet basil

    Country of Origin: Hungary

    Part of plant used in production: flowering tops and leaves

    Methods of production: Steam distillation

    Description: A tender annual herb with very dark green, ovate leaves and a powerful aromatic scent.
    Characteristics: A colourless to pale yellow essential oil with a pleasantly sweet, refreshingly herbaceous odour.
    Properties: Analgesic, antidepressant, antiseptic, antispasmodic, carminative, cephalic, diaphoretic, digestive, emmenogogue, expectorant, febrifuge, nervine, sudoforic.
    Constituents: Linalool (40-45 %), methyl chavicol (23.8 %) and small amounts of eugenol, limonene and citronellol.
    Uses: A popular addition to baked goods, meat, vegetables, sweets, soups, beverages, chewing gum, and dental products. Basil oil is said to stimulate the mind, giving it strength and clarity. It is good for the respiratory system, for the relief of sinus congestion, asthma, bronchitis, influenza, and wooping coughs. It supports the body's yang energy and is good in digestive disorders.
    Blends well with Bergamot, black pepper, cajeput, eucalyptus, frankincense, geranium, ginger, hyssop, lavender, lemon, marjoram, neroli, rosemary, peppermint, pine, thyme and tea tree.
    Interesting Facts: Basil was considered the king amongst plants and is therefore named for a royal 'Basileum.' In Ayurvedic medicine, basil opens the heart and mind, bestowing the energy of love and devotion. It is considered the sacred herb in India, dedicated to Krishna and Vishnu. It is said that basil strengthens faith, compassion and clarity.
    Safety: Dilute at 4%. Generally non-irritant, non-sensitizing and non-toxic. Do not use if pregnant due to emmenagogue properties. May be irritating and sensitizing to people with sensitive skin.
  • Bergamot

    Botanical binomial: Citrus aurantium subsp. bergamia

    Family: Rutaceae

    Other names: Citrus bergamia

    Country of Origin: Calabria in southern Italy

    Part of plant used in production: Fruit

    Methods of production: Expression

    Description: Bergamot, also known as bitter orange is a tree specifically cultivated for it's valuable essential oil.
    Characteristics: A refreshing yet delicate scent similar to lemon and orange but with a floral overtone. Bergamot can be associated with Earl Grey tea, Eau de Cologne, and Italian folk treatment for fever.
    Properties: Analgesic, antidepressant, sedative, antiseptic, cicatrisant, deodorant, digestive, vermifuge, vulnerary, tonic, carminative
    Constituents: alpha-pinene (1.0%), beta-pinene (5.7%), limonene (33%), linalool (13.4%), linalyl acetate (31.3%), alpha-terpineol (0.13%)
    Uses: A sedative for anxiety, depression, and nervous tension with an uplifting flowery freshness, Bergamot is best used in a diffuser or in massage blends. It is an important ingredient in perfumery and one of the most popular in men's colognes. Used to treat cold sores, chicken pox, shingles, bronchitis, tuberculosis, relieves flatulence and indigestion. It's antiseptic properties make it ideal for treating acne and oily skin conditions
    Blends well with: Neroli, rosemary, basil lavender, lemon, geranium, eucalyptus, chamomile, cypress, grapefruit, juniper, jasmine, marjoram, orange, palmarosa, patchouli, petitgrain, rose otto, rose absolute, sandalwood, ylang-ylang.
    Interesting Facts: : Bergamot trees cannot be propagated by seed, they can only be grafted onto bitter orange trees.
    Safety: Bergamot is phototoxic and should therefore not be used before sun exposure to the skin. Dilute to less than 1% to avoid phototoxicity.
  • Black Currant Bud Absolute

    Botanical binomial: Ribes nigrum L.

    Family: Grossulariaceae

    Other names:

    Country of Origin: France

    Part of plant used in production: Flowers bud

    Methods of production: Solvent extraction

    Description: Blackcurrant is a bushy perennial shrub.
    Characteristics: Fruity and powerful note of crushed blackcurrant leaves with both an acid and liquorish twist.
    Properties: Fragrances
    Constituents: Sabinene, para-cymene, delta-3-carene, beta-phellandrene, beta-caryophyllene, hardwickic acid
    Uses: The fascinating notes of blackcurrant bud absolute makes it great for purfumers.
    Blends well with: Armoise, Bergamot and other citrus oils, Boronia, Cilantro, Cistus, Cognac, Coriander, Galbanum, Jasmine, Lavandin, Lavender, Lime, Orange Blossom, Rose, Sandalwood, Spearmint, Tarragon, Violet Leaf, Ylang ylang.
    Interesting Facts: The name blackcurrant comes from the work cassia, the name of an Asian spice and purgative fruit once popular in Europe.
    Safety:
  • Black Spruce

    Botanical binomial: Picea mariana

    Family: Pinaceae

    Other names: Bog Spruce, Eastern Spruce, Shortleaf Black Spruce, Swamp Spruce

    Country of Origin: Canada

    Part of plant used in production: needles and twigs

    Methods of production: Steam distillation

    Description: Black Spruce is one of Canada's most abundant evergreen trees. It grows in forests all over the country on humid soil with either granite, sand or peat present. The trees can slowly grow up to 10m high, their dense clusters creating cool shade which is an ideal environment for moss and creatures of the forest.
    Characteristics: A colourless, transparent oil with a soft, sweet smell.
    Properties: Anti-inflammatory, antifungal, antiparasitic, antispasmodic, neurotonic
    Constituents: bornyl acetate, camphene, pinene, 3-carene
    Uses: Black spruce can be a very positive energy booster when applied on the adrenal glads. It is also used for treating post-menopause disorders, hyperthyroidism, immunodeficiency, acne and dry skin irritations and for curing bronchitis.
    Blends well with Balsam poplar, ginger, scotch pine
    Interesting Facts: Black spruce is used to prepare spruce beer, traditionally made by the French colonists. It has been used for centuries by the Native peoples to cure diarrhea, relieve sore throats and tooth aches and to treat burns and infections. Today, it is largely used in the paper industry due to its soft and twistable fibres.
    Safety: Non-toxic, non-irritant.
  • Cardamom

    Botanical binomial: Elettaria cardamomum

    Family: Zingiberaceae

    Other names: Cardamom

    Country of Origin: Guatemala

    Part of plant used in production: Dry ripe fruits and seeds

    Methods of production: Steam distillation

    Description: Cardamom is a perennial shrub up to four meters high with very long leaves. Flowers are small, yellow with purple tips. Essential oil is extracted from seeds and pods that are gathered between September and March, just before they are ripe. The plantations in Guatemala are located at altitudes ranging from 2 000 to 4 000 ft, in areas where the soils are moist and retentive of water.
    Characteristics: Pale yellow with a sweet-spicy, warm fragrance and a woody undertone.
    Properties: Antiseptic, antispasmodic, expectorant, aphrodisiac, nerve and hart tonic, stimulant, mood uplifting, warming.
    Constituents: Cardamom oil is rich in 1,8 cineol (36.3%) and ? terpinil acetate (31.3%). It's antiseptic, antispasmodic, and expectorant properties are due to the presence of 1,8 cineol. Nervous system stimulation is induced by ? terpinil acetate.
    Uses: Cardamom is an excellent refreshing and soothing bath oil, best blended with other oils. Use for headaches, mental fatigue, anxiety, stress, insomnia and nervous weakness of all types. Cardamomum is used in the food industry for spices such as curry, confectionery, pickles and sausages. It is also used in perfumery, tobacco, chewing gum and candy industries.
    Blends well with Bergamot, black pepper, fennel, frankincense, geranium, ginger, lemon, myrtle, and floral fragrances in minute amounts. For an aphrodisiac, restorative massage oil, add a few drops of Cardamom to a sensual blend of essences such as jasmine, sandalwood and neroli.
    Interesting Facts: Medically, the oil is used as warming to the body, relieves pains, it is mood uplifting, improves digestion and improves mental clarity and memory.In Chinese medicine, Cardamom is used as Qi tonic, because of its effect on the spirit or mind. Cardamom oil has ability to remove depression and listlessness.The Romans and Arabs used Cardamom oil to settle gastrointestinal problems.
    Safety: Non-toxic, non-irritant, non sensitizing.
  • Carrot Seed oil

    Botanical binomial: Daucus carota

    Family: Apiaceae (Umbelliferae)

    Other names: Wild carrot

    Country of Origin: Hungary

    Part of plant used in production: Dried fruit or seeds

    Methods of production: Steam distillation

    Description: Wild carrot is an annual herbaceous plant with branched stems, hairy leaves and umbels of tiny white flowers. It's root is also white but inedible. The plant is native to Europe, Asia and North Africa but has been naturalised in North America.
    Characteristics: The oil is amber-yellow in colour with a warm, dry, with an earthy odour and a light fruity-floral note.
    Properties: Antiseptic, carminative, diuretic,hypo-renal depurative,hepatic, stimulant, tonic, vasodilatory and smooth muscle relaxant.
    Constituents: Pinene, carotol, daucol, limonene, bisabolene, elemene, geraniol, geranyl acetate, caryphyllene.
    Uses: Carrot oil is used to treat and regenerate liver and thyroid. It is a popular addition to food seasonings and is an ingredient in many soaps, detergents, perfumes and massage oils.
    Blends well with Bergamot, cedarwood, citrus oils,cypress, fennel, geranium, lavender, rosemary, rose otto, sandalwood.
    Interesting Facts: The root of Daucus carota is used for treating liver and gall bladder ailments while the seeds promote menstruation and are used to cure digestive disorders. Wild carrot oil is thought to cure a broken heart by acting on the throat and crown chakras. One drop of oil in warm water per week is enough for this purpose. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, carrot oil is used to dislodge worms and treat dysentery.
    Safety: Non-toxic, non-irritant, non sensitizing. Avoid during pregnancy
  • Catnip oil

    Botanical binomial: Nepeta cataria

    Family: Lamiaceae

    Other names: Catmint, Catswort

    Country of Origin: Canada

    Part of plant used in production: Leaf and stem

    Methods of production: Steam distillation

    Description: Catnip is a perennial, herbaceous plant blooming late spring to autumn. Resembling typical members of the mint family.
    Characteristics: The oil is a clear, yellow to light brown liquid that is rich, herbaceous in aroma with a mild floral note.
    Properties: Sedative, Carminative, Diuretic, Nervine, Emmenagogue, and Diaphoretic.
    Constituents: Nepetalactone, β-caryophyllene, α-humulene, carvone, cis ocimene, limonene, α-pinene, β-pinene.
    Uses: Traditionally, catnip is used as an insect repellant. It also helps in alleviating fever, migraine, ulcers and nervous system disorders as well as easing muscular, intestinal or menstrual cramps.
    Blends well with Grapefruit, lavender, lemon, marjoram, peppermint, orange, rosemary, spearmint.
    Interesting Facts: The herb is a stimulant for felines, where most find an intense attraction to them – this is where the name Catnip derived from.
    Safety: Avoid during pregnancy
  • Cedarwood Atlas

    Botanical binomial: Cedrus atlantica

    Family: Pinaceae

    Other names: Atlantic cedar, Moroccan cedarwood

    Country of Origin: Morocco

    Part of plant used in production: Wood

    Methods of production: Steam distillation

    Description: A tall (up to 40 meter) evergreen tree believed to have originated from the famous Lebanon cedars which were prized building wood that symbolized fertility and abundance of the land.
    Characteristics: Atlantica oil is a viscous deep amber with a sweet, warm scent and a woody-balsamic note.
    Properties: Antiseptic, astringent, diruetic, expectorant, insecticide, sedative.
    Constituents: Atlantone, caryophyllene, cedrol, cadinene
    Uses: This warm, calming oil is useful for balancing energies and managing anger, stress and nervous tension. It is a good hair tonic for dandruff and allopecia. Cedarwood greatly benefits the respiratory system, soothing bronchitis, and coughs. It's antiseptic properties benefit the bladder and kidneys.
    Blends well with Bergamot, cinnamon, cypress, frankincense, jasmine, juniper, lavender, lemon, neroli, patchouli, rose, orange, sandalwood, and ylang-ylang.
    Interesting Facts: Cedar's resin was used to preserve bodies from putrefaction and it's oil for cosmetics and perfumery by the ancient Egyptians.
    Safety: Non-toxic, non-irritant, non sensitizing.
  • Cedarwood, virginiana

    Botanical binomial: Juniperus virginiana

    Family: Cupressaceae

    Other names: Red cedar

    Country of Origin: U.S.A.

    Part of plant used in production: Wood

    Methods of production: Steam distillation

    Description: A coniferous, slow growing, evergreen tree up to 35 meters high, a narrow, dense pyramidal crown, a reddish heartwood and brown cones. Native to North America, Virginian Cedarwood also grows in East Africa and China.
    Characteristics: Virginian oil is colourless to pale yellow or pale orange with a woody-sweet, resinous, persistant mild odour. Some describe the smell as pencil-like.
    Properties: Antiseborrhoeic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, astringent, diuretic, emmenagogue, expectorant, insecticidal, sedative (nervous system).
    Constituents: Cedrol (1-32%), cedrene (15-31%), cedrene (1-8%), thujopsene (14-35%).
    Uses: Similar to Atlas Cedarwood, cedarwood virginian is used in perfumes, soaps, and air fresheners. It is also said to alleviate acne, scabs, dermatitis, psoriasis, seborrhoea of the scalp, alopecia, and dandruff. It has a calming effect on nervous tension and helps relieve anxiety and stress-related disorders.
    Blends well with Bergamot, cypress, frankincense, juniper, lavender, lemon, lime, neroli, rose, rosewood, sandalwood, vetiver
    Interesting Facts: The Indigenous peoples of North America used virginian cedarwood for respiratory infections, especially those involving catarrh.
    Safety: Non-toxic, non-irritant, non sensitizing. Best avoided during pregnancy.
  • Cinnamon Leaf Oil

    Botanical binomial: Cinnamomum zeylandicum

    Family: Lauraceae

    Other names: C. verum, Laurus cinnamomum

    Country of Origin: Sri Lanka and Indonesia

    Part of plant used in production: Leaf

    Methods of production: Water or Steam Distillation

    Description: A tall tropical evergreen tree, cinnamon can be used for both it's bark- the familiar culinary spice, and leaves as a stimulating oil and spice.
    Characteristics: A warm, spicy smell
    Properties: Analgesic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, aphrodisiac, cardiac, carminative, emmenagogue, insecticide, stimulant, stomachic, tonic, vermifuge.
    Constituents: Eugenol (80-96%), Eugenol acetate (1%), cinnamic aldehyde (3%), benzyl benzoate (3%)
    Uses: Considered a cure-all in Traditional Chinese Medicine, Cinnamon oil acts as a nerve tranquilizer, tonic, and is considered good for a weak heart. Use in a diffuser to aleviate feelings of depression, weakness, or exhaustion. Cinnamon is a very effective antiseptic, digestive, and anti-rheumatic. It alleviates colds and congestions, stimulates secretions of gastric juices and is a tonic for the digestive tract.
    Blends well with: Black pepper, clove, eucalyptus, frankincense, ginger, grapefruit, lavnender, lemon, orange, rosemary, tangerine, thyme, tea tree
    Interesting Facts: : Cinnamon trade was one of the key reasons that led to the Portuguese discovering the route around the Cape to India.
    Safety: Cinnamon leaf oil is relatively non-toxic and can be used on skin when diluted in carrier oil. Cinnamon bark oil should never be used on the skin as it is an irritant, toxin, and sensitizer.
  • Citronella

    Botanical binomial: Cymbopogon nardus

    Family: Poaceae (Germineae)

    Other names: Andropogon nardus, oleum citronellae

    Country of Origin: n/a

    Part of plant used in production: Dried grass

    Methods of production: Steam distillation

    Description: A tall, aromatic, perennial grass.
    Characteristics: Citronella oil is yellow-brown with a powerfully fresh, lemony scent.
    Properties: Antiseptic, antibacterial, deodorant, diaphoretic, febrifuge, tonic.
    Constituents: Acetylizable alcohols (geraniol) (55-65%), and total aldehydes (7-15%) among others.
    Uses: Citronella has an uplifting effect, easing feelings of sadness and depression. Commonly inhaled to treat colds, flus and minor infections. Citronella's deodorizing effects combat excessive perspiration as well as refreshing tired, sweaty feet.
    Blends well with Bergamot, cedarwood, eucalyptus, geranium, lavender, lemon, peppermint, rosemary, sage, tea tree, thyme.
    Interesting Facts: The leaves of citronella have been used for centuries for their medical and aromatic properties. It is used by many cultures for fevers, intestinal parasites, digestive and menstrual problems.
    Safety: Non-toxic, non-irritant, may cause dermatitis in some individuals.
  • Clary Sage

    Botanical binomial: Salvia sclarea

    Family: Lamiaceae

    Other names: Clary wort, clear eye, common clary

    Country of Origin: Russia

    Part of plant used in production: Fresh flowers

    Methods of production: Steam distillation

    Description: Clary Sage is a biennial or perennial herb that can grow up to 1 metre in height. The plant has purple or blue flowers and hairy leaves.
    Characteristics: Salvia scalera produces a clear to pale yellow oil. It's odour is pungent, floral, fresh, and sweet-herbaceous with a bitter-sweet or nutty undertone
    Properties: Sedative on the nervous system and spasmodic on smooth muscle due to linalyl acetate. The oil exhibits a cooling effect on inflammation.
    Constituents: Clary sage oil contains a mixture of monoterpene esters and monoterpene alcohols. Its dominant components are linalyl acetate (63-80%), and linalool (8-28 %).
    Uses: Treating depression, cleansing and rejuvinating skin and hair, perfumery, and some food essences. Clary sage is used as a component in soaps, detergents, creams, lotions and perfumes. Maximum amount reported in perfumes is 0.8%.
    Blends well with Bergamot, citrus, frankincense, geranium, jasmine, neroli, petitgrain, pine,sandalwood, ylang-ylang.
    Interesting Facts: Clary sage was originally produced for perfumery and fragnance trades. In the Middle Ages it was used t aid digestion, clear out the kidneys and decrease menstrual problems. The name 'clear-eye' comes from the historic use of the seeds to treat eye infections.
    Safety: Non-toxic, non-irritant, and non- sensitizing at 8% dilution. Caution should be taken if pregnant or lactating due to the spasmolytic effect of the oil.
  • Clove bud

    Botanical binomial: Eugenia caryophyllata

    Family: Myrtacea

    Other names: Syzygium aromaticum, Eugenia aromaica, E. caryophyllus

    Country of Origin: Madagascar

    Part of plant used in production: Buds

    Methods of production: Steam distillation

    Description: A tall, slender evergreen tree with rosy-pink corolla at the start of the rainy season. As the corolla fades later on in the season the calyx becomes deep red. The calyx is then beaten from the tree and dried, providing buds. Clove oil may also be made from the stems and leaves of the tree which gives it a variety of uses due to different components found in each.
    Characteristics: Clove bud oil has a soft, floral scent contrary to the strong spicy odour of stem or leaf oils. It is colourless to yellow-brown, darkening with age.
    Properties: Analgesic, anticeptic, antispasmodic, carminative, stomachic, uterine.
    Constituents: Eugenol (80-85%), Eugenyl acetate (8-12%), Caryophyllene (6-10%), Isocaryophyllene (0-2.0%).
    Uses: Clove oils are useful in treating inflammations such as rheumatoid arthritis and other musculoskeletal conditions. Their anaesthetic properties are essential for toothaches. Clove oils also stimulates digestion, restores appetite and relieves flatulence. It is used in many foods and beverages and specifically clove bud oil is used in pharmaceutical and dental products. In perfumery, bud oil forms the basis of carnation, rose and honeysuckle perfumes.
    Blends well with Basil, black perpper, cinnamon, ginger, lavender, lemon, nutmeg, orange, peppermint, rosemary, thyme.
    Interesting Facts: The common name clove comes from the French clou meaning nail due to the resemblanceof the buds to tiny nails.
    Safety: Non-sensitizing and non-irritating at 5% dilution or 0.2% in dermatoses patients. Clove bud oil is safer on the skin than clove leaf or stem oils. It should not be used directly on the skin unless diluted under 1%.
  • Chamomile German

    Botanical binomial: Matricaria recutita

    Family: Asteraceae (Compositae)

    Other names: Blue Chamomile

    Country of Origin: Serbia

    Part of plant used in production: Flower heads

    Methods of production: Steam distillation

    Description: German Chamomile is an annual aromatic herb with branching stems, feathery leaves, and white flowers.
    Characteristics: A dark blue, semi-viscous oil that has a sweet herbaceous odour with a fruity undertone.
    Properties: Analgesic, anti-allergenic, anti-inflamma tory, antispasmodic, cicatrisant, hepatic, sedative, vasoconstrictor, vermifuge, vulnerary.
    Constituents: Chamalulene, bisabolol, bisabolol oxide A, bisabolol oxide B
    Uses: Commonly administered to relieve inflammations , cuts, acne, insect bites, toothaches, muscle pains, arthritis, menstual problems, and urinary infections. It works great on eczema, and allergies as well as decreasing redness of cheeks due to swollen capillaries. German chamomile is found in high-class perfumes because it prompts a warm, rich undertone during evaporation.
    Blends well with Bergamot, carrot seed, clary sage, lavender, patchouli, jasmine, rose, sandalwood, ylang-ylang. Great for massage when diluted in evening primrose and jojoba oils.
    Interesting Facts: The herb has a long medical tradition in Europe.
    Safety: Non-toxic, non-irritant, non sensitising.
  • Chamomile, Roman

    Botanical binomial: Asteraceae (Compositae)

    Family: Garden chamomile, Anthemis nobilis

    Other names: Garden chamomile, Anthemis nobilis

    Country of Origin: Hungary

    Part of plant used in production: Flower heads

    Methods of production: Steam distillation

    Description: Roman chamomile is a small, perennial herb with hairy stems and pinnate leaves. It's daisy-like flowers are larger than those of German chamomile and the plant itself smells like a hint of apple.
    Characteristics: The essential oil is pale yellow with a light blue note. It has a warm, fruity-herbaceous scent.
    Properties: Analgesic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, bactericidal, carminative, cicatrisant, digestive, hepatic, nerve sedative, vermifuge, vulnerary.
    Constituents: Chamaemelum nobile consists mostly of esters of angelic and tiglic acids. These and other major components are: propul angelate (0.5-10%), butyl angelate (0.5-10%), pinene (0.5-10%), camphene (0-0.5%), pinene (0-10%), 1,8 cineole (0.5-25%), sabinene (0-10%).
    Uses: Due to its high ester content, Roman chamomile is wonderful for inhalation. It's pleasing aroma is comforting for children who suffer from colic, tooth pain, and throat infections. It reduces hayfever, asthma, and other allaergies. Roman chamomile is also used as a bath or massage oil for relieving PMS symptoms, abdominal pain, anxiety, tension, and insomnia.
    Blends well with Bergamot, clary sage, geranium, lavender, lemon, sweet marjorom, neroli, orange, rose otto, sandalwood, ylang-ylang.
    Interesting Facts: Roman chamomile is a popular herb used for medicinal purposes in Europe for over 2000 years. The herb can be used as a shampoo to lighten blonde hair. Roman chamomile oil is used to treat psychological problems and is said to benefit for those who are short tempered, self involved, overly sensitive or rarely satisfied.
    Safety: Non-irritant, non-sensitizing, non-toxic. Avoid using during pregnancy. Contact dermatitis has been reported with topical application of Roman chamomile.
  • Cognac, Green Oil

    Botanical binomial: Vitis vinifera

    Family: Vitaceae

    Other names:

    Country of Origin: France

    Part of plant used in production: Lees (wine sediment)

    Methods of production: Steam distillation

    Description: Green cognac is produced from grapevines, Vitis vinifera well known for its fruit, when fermented produces wine.
    Characteristics: A middle/base note that is pale yellow to greenish yellow with a dry, tart, wine-like aroma along with notes of green apple.
    Properties: Aesthetic purposes, enhancing fragrances.
    Constituents: Ethyl decanoate and ethyl dedecanoate, decanoic acid .
    Uses: Cognac green is commonly used as a top notes of perfumes providing lift and fresh aroma, and natural fruit notes in colognes, after shaves and other fragrance products. Also, used in shampoos for shine and voluminous hair.
    Blends well with: Ambrette seed, amyl salicylate, bergamot, coriander, galbanum, lavender, linalool, clary sage, styrax, ylang ylang.
    Interesting Facts: In the wine-making industry, cognac green oil is the by-product of this process.
    Safety:
  • Cognac, White Oil

    Botanical binomial: Vitis vinifera L.

    Family: Vitaceae

    Other names:

    Country of Origin: France

    Part of plant used in production: Wine dregs

    Methods of production: Steam distillation

    Description: Vitis vinifera is a shrub that can stretch to several meters in length. It is known primarily for its grapes for wine production.
    Characteristics: A colourless to amber yellow liquid with a fruity character, as well as syrupy and butyric facets.
    Properties: Fragrances and flavouring
    Constituents: Ethyl caprate (C10) and ethyl laurate (C12)
    Uses: With its powerful aroma yet green-herbaceous note, it makes a great addition to men scents.
    Blends well with: Ambrette seed, bergamot, coriander, galbanum, lavender, linalool, clary sage, ylang ylang.
    Interesting Facts:
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  • Coffee Oil

    Botanical binomial: Coffea arabica

    Family: n/a

    Other names: Coffee

    Country of Origin: Guatemala

    Part of plant used in production: Seeds- either green or roasted

    Methods of production: Cold press of seeds

    Description: Coffee plants naturally grow in South American rainforests. They produce red fruits which are roasted to produce to coffee we all know.
    Characteristics: The oil is thick and dark with a warming scent of freshly brewed coffee.
    Properties: Antioxidant, diuretic, stimulant, deodorizer
    Constituents: Caffeine cafestol and kahweol diterpenes.
    Uses: Coffee oil is used for flavouring confectionery such as chocolate and baked goods, cosmetic products such as sun blocks and colognes, and medical treatments for headaches, asthma and increasing blood pressure and heart and lung activity.
    Blends well with Coffee is best used on its own but can be combined with peppermint, spearmint, or vanilla for an appetizing sweet scent.
    Interesting Facts: n/a
    Safety: Use caution if pregnant or if you have hypertension. Coffee may cause heart palpations in certain individuals.
  • Cornmint Oil

    Botanical binomial: Mentha arvensis

    Family: Lamiaceae

    Other names: Japanese Mint, Field Mint

    Country of Origin: India

    Part of plant used in production: Flowering plant

    Methods of production: Steam distillation

    Description: Cornmint sometimes is passed for peppermint, however they are not the same when looking at the menthol content. Cornmint provides a higher menthol content in its oil.
    Characteristics: Cornmint has a strong minty, herbaceous aroma presenting a top fragrance note.
    Properties: Anti-microbial, anesthetic, anti-septic, anti-spasmodic, stimulant and a digestive.
    Constituents: Menthol, Menthone, Isomenthone, Limonene, Pinene.
    Uses: The bitter yet sweet mint oil works wonders to help revitalize and rejuvenate the respiratory system as well as soothe tired, sore muscles and joints. The warmth of oil provide relief for nausea associated with motion or morning sickness. The body uses Cornmint oil for treatments of asthma, colic, exhaustion, flu, flatulence, headache, nausea, scabies, sinusitis, vertigo.
    Blends well with: Basil, benzoin, black pepper, cypress, eucalyptus, geranium, grapefruit, juniper, lavender, lemon, marjoram, naiouli, pine, ravensara, rosemary, tea tree.
    Interesting Facts:
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  • Cypress

    Botanical binomial: Cupressus sempervirens

    Family: Cupressaceae

    Other names: There are many species of cypress throughout the world. C. sempervirens is best used for aromatherapy purposes

    Country of Origin: France, Germany

    Part of plant used in production: Fresh leaves and cones

    Methods of production: Distillation

    Description: An evergreen tree native to Europe with slender branches and small flowers and cones or nuts.
    Characteristics: Woody, spicy, refreshing
    Properties: Antiseptic, antispasmodic, astringent, deodorant, diuretic, haemostatic, hepatic, styptic, studorific, tonic, vasoconstrictor.
    Constituents: alpha- pinene (20%), camphene (3.6%), sabinene (2.8%), beta-pinene (2.9%), δ-3-carene (21.5%), terpinolene (6.3%), cedrol (5.35%)
    Uses: Cypress oil restores calm and is said to strengthen an overburdened nervous system. For spiritual purposes, use in major decision-making to remove blocks and cleanse the spirit. For the body, use cypress oil for circulatory problems such as varicose veins and hemorrhoids. Blend with lemon, wheatgerm oil, and calendula for best results.
    Blends well with: Bergamot, clary sage, fennel, grapefruit, juniper, lavender, lemon, lime, orange, pine, rosemary, tangerine
    Interesting Facts: The ancient Greeks, Romans, and Egyptians dedicated the cypress tree to their gods of the underworld. This is why cypress can be found in many cemeteries.
    Safety:




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